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Audrey Hepburn

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Audrey Hepburn Print Released By House Of Roulx

FREE HUMANITY EXCLUSIVE
Audrey Hepburn Print Release by House Of Roulx

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Frida Kahlo Print release by House Of Roulx

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Mother Theresa

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Be Mindful!

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Spray It #FREEHUMANITY

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Jan Van Eyck

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Street Audrey

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Notorious BIG

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Audrey Hepburn

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Yakoi Kusama

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Notrious BIG Print Release By House Of Roulx

FREE HUMANITY EXCLUSIVE
Notorious BIG Print Release By House Of Roulx

FREE HUMANITY EXCLUSIVE
Audrey Hepburn

FREE HUMANITY EXCLUSIVE
Frida Kahlo Print Released by House of Roulx

FREE HUMANITY EXCLUSIVE
Free Humanity FH Signature Style

Your name says it all! How did you choose your name “Free Humanity”? Is there an interesting story behind it?

The idea for the name has been in my head for a long time growing up here in America. An idea that stemmed from just being proud to be human- no race no country, just humans as an interconnected whole.

I have been a fan of your iconic street art for some time now and your mission on your site and social media really caught my eye. “Taking back the Humanity stolen from our minds by social manipulation and planting seed of positivity through art and consciousness.” What social message do you hope to communicate through your work?

I try to convey socially, politically, and spiritually aware messages in all my pieces. I like to think of it as planting positive seeds in a world filled with ads trying to plant seeds of insecurity. Which makes people feel the need to buy this or that for material purposes only. This social manipulation is deeply seeded in the collective unconscious. I feel art is the only way to combat that. Public space is owned by the public not by the corporations. I feel obligated to put up conscious artwork instead of contributing to the already over saturated, over sexualized ads and “art”.

You often use iconic women such as Audrey Hepburn and Frida Kahlo in your work. Why do you choose them? Do they represent a sense of empowerment you want to express through your art?

I have had a long running series of Humanitarians one of them being Audrey Hepburn. Audrey Hepburn has been a reoccurring motif in my work, due to the not so commonly known fact that she was a big humanitarian and worked to feed young children in Ethiopia for UNICEF. My goal was to put a little bit of class amongst all the trash in Hollywood and LA. In a world of over sexualized ads I wanted to do a few murals and art pieces to show a classy selfless actress, which seems to be a rarity in today’s modern times.” There are a few iconic women that I have painted. I am in the works of an oil painting of Lee Krasner, the wife of Jackson Pollock. She was a great painter and is the sole reason the value of art has sky rocketed.

The people I choose to paint I feel have contributed something contemporary to society like Frida Kahlo, Audrey Hepburn and Yayoi Kusama. I can only hope to do the same.

You are clearly comfortable in using a variety of mediums and have no fear. Your work is intensely detailed and layered. Can you explain your creative process and what techniques you feel comfortable using?

I started making simple one layer stencils and eventually evolved to a more photo realistic stencil style that tends to be a lot more intricate, deeply layered and labor intensive. I have been doing the notoriously known FH Signature Style since 2010 perfecting my free hand spray paint background consisting of fat cap flared multi-colored hearts. The last 10 months I have been oil painting and working on abstract work in the public sector and in the studio trying to tie those mediums together.

Most the work I do is so labor intensive that I have only a few pieces for sale every year. I make sure not to do too much of the same thing to keep the process inspiring and fun. I feel too many artists are prisoners of their own style never unleashing their full creative potential as artists.

What inspires you to create? Is it a particular person, music, other artists…?

Mostly art and artists inspire me. From conceptual artists like Martin Creed to the contemporary modern masters such as Picasso, Pollock, Mark Rothko, Yayoi Kusama and Gerhard Richter (all which I have made portraits of) all the way back to the classical painters from the Renaissance like Caravaggio or Rembrandt from the Dutch Golden Age.

What is next on your creative journey? Do you have any upcoming shows or projects you are looking forward to?

I never really know what’s next creatively, inspiration just hits and when it does I just do whatever feels right. I’m really excited to release my 1st toy through the Legendary DKE Toys at SDCC San Diego Comic Con. ( it’s still kinda top secret )

I was thrilled to have a piece at NYU New York University for the Kimmel Windows Art St 13 Windows 1 Wall Show curated by Mar Kayle. I have released a few exclusive prints though HouseOfRoulx.com where I painted over an original Audrey Hepburn Photo my famed photographer Milton Greene.

I recently went to New York to paint a few Murals, one for the Welling Court Mural Festival Curated by Garrison Buxton and another also in Queens Astoria curated by Michelanglo from Energea NYC. As well as a few other places like First City Project in Glen Cove Long Island associated with Dorian Grey, Martin Auto body Concept and Street Art Direct, 17 Frost Gallery in Brooklyn curated by Ellis Gallagher, and doing some work with my friends UR New York.

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