JANA BRIKE

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JANA BRIKE
"The Void"

JANA BRIKE
"The Search For One True Love"

JANA BRIKE
"Two Wounded Angels On The Beach"

JANA BRIKE
"Girl With A Golden Heart Basking In The Sunshine"

JANA BRIKE
"No Escape From This Beautiful Dream"

JANA BRIKE
"Little Death In The Bluebells Grove'

JANA BRIKE
"Girl Flying Above It All"

JANA BRIKE
"The End Of A Lonesome Road"

JANA BRIKE
"Overgrowth In Eve's Garden"

JANA BRIKE
"The Blue Diary"

JANA BRIKE
"Soul Sisters"

JANA BRIKE
"Girl In Love"

JANA BRIKE
"Long Lasting Springtime"

JANA BRIKE
"Nectar"

Your art is ever so dreamy and provides a strong narrative of self-discovery and innocence. Where do you get your inspiration from? Is it from places you have visited, dreams…?

The self-discovery IS my inspiration, and I do it through my life’s journey and emotional processes, and my art creation as such is a self-discovery and thus a self-sustaining driving force. 

You have had to censor some of your recent pieces on social media. How do you feel about censorship in the art world?

The request to censor paintings on social media is just a pimple on an organism that is sick from the inside. All the perception of the body and its processes, especially the female body, is just askew in our so called “civilized” world.

Your art leaves me feeling very emotional and stirs up deep memories. What message would you like to communicate through your work?

I do not really communicate some specific direct message. I believe an artwork is a mirror to the self, both, for the creator of it, as well as for the viewer. If it is a strong artwork, you won’t be overwhelmed with reading the artist’s life in it, you will read your own. How else can you explain that one and the same artwork can provoke responses as diverse as – it is so full of love to the self, of harmony and acceptance – and – it is all abuse and ugliness. We lie to ourselves about the self. There are grand blind-spots in the perception. And a mirror – either it is close human relationships or other emotional triggers like art – is needed.

You typically work with oil paint but are there any other mediums you would like to experiment with more in the future? What is your typical creative process when starting a new piece?

I don’t think I will stop painting anytime soon, but I have done also animations, installations, digital media, drawing, sculpture, photography and more. But I just love the slow meditative process of oil painting most of all. My studio is a bad mess in the middle of my work on a series. It starts with the overall feeling, a state of mind and state of heart, and then come the images like flashes on my mind. Then I sketch, gather reference material, paint and paint till I am happy with the emotional vibe it all radiates.

You recently debuted your new collection, “Superabundance of Ordinary Being” at Modern Eden. Many pieces made reference to the trials and tribulations of love, emotions we can all relate to. What inspired this collection? Did this series come from a place close to your heart?

Yes, it did. I actually painted it from a very broken place. From where your most sincere, deep and innocent love for another being is not just not answered back – which is painful but still quite all right to live through – but it is more – disrespected and disregarded as something not worth a second glance, where the most sacred and most valuable to you part of yours that you dare to open and show to another is cast away as something of no consequence. The painting process to me has always been my work through the suppressed emotions and wounds, shedding light on the shadow part and transcending it. Shadow to light through emotional cleansing in a delicate, deep and personal process. I can’t show it all directly, but some of this is perceptible to a sensitive individual I think.

Have you ever collaborated with other artists? Are there artists that inspire your work?

I have collaborated with some of my friends, and it’s been inspiring in a sense that it has given me new unexpected contexts for my work, and made me look at myself and my work from a different angle. But in my heart, I’m a loner. I like to control the process from start to finish. I’m trying to break through it though, as it doesn’t let me create really big events.

What is next for you in your creative journey? Do you have any upcoming projects or shows you are looking forward to?

I am working for a solo exhibition in Philippines next year, and some exciting group exhibitions with some of my dream galleries, also a big and very special and important event in 2018. I do look forward to it all very much.

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